Don Mead's blog

Syria: Evolving Perceptions of a Tenacious Conflict

In May of 2017, I was privileged to join a group of travelers who spent ten days in Syria and Lebanon. Eleven of us traveled from the United States on a trip organized by the Syria/Lebanon Partnership Network of the PC(USA). Entitled “Mutually Encouraged by Each Other’s Faith,” the goal of the trip was “to share worship, fellowship and a mutual time of learning with PC(USA) partners in Syria and Lebanon.”

Alongside those objectives set by the organizers of the trip, my own goal arose from my belief that the conflict in Syria is one of the greatest humanitarian crises in my lifetime. I continue to wrestle with the ways in which a person like myself, committed to non-violence, can find a path through that violence-filled conflict.

This blog post reports on what I learned and my thoughts on the way forward for this painful and protracted conflict.

Confronting the Crisis in Syria: A Peace-Seeker's Perspective

For those who are concerned about the increasing militarization of American foreign policy, Syria may be the central place where that is playing out today.

Faith, in the Midst of Conflict

On a recent visit to Israel and Palestine, the force of the occupation was in plain sight in many places. One of those involved time spent with members of the Greek Orthodox Church in Beit Jala, where we came face to face with ways in which the occupation challenges their faith. The occupation calls on us all to draw on our faith in ways that will sustain our hope for better times.

The Power of a Committed, Morally Sound Minority

A powerful speech by Martin Luther King reminds us of the ways in which a committed, morally sound minority can change the course of history.

Presbyterians and Pacifism

The Presbyterian church has a long engagement with issues of war and peace. Many Presbyterians have been powerful spokespersons for an understanding of their faith that committed them to a complete rejection of war and military force as a way of resolving conflicts.

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